Crosman M4-177 Pneumatic Air Rifle

Crosman M4-177 Pneumatic Air Rifle

Crosman M4-177 Pneumatic Air Rifle

The famous Crosman Rifle Company`s history dates to the end of World War I. Founded in 1923 and known as the Crosman Corporation it is situated in East Bloomfield, New York. The Crosman name is known by gun enthusiasts as a manufacturer and marketer of Crosman pellet and BB rifles and pistols, as well as gun optics and archery products. The latest addition to their product line is a unique hunting crossbow announced at SHOT show 2016, dubbed “AirBow”, it’s a hybrid of a PCP airgun and a crossbow, that shoots a bolt at 450 feet per second. Crosman has been committed to providing top-notch quality products for several decades now. Hence, customers can rest assured that quality is never compromised.
As one of the largest airgun distributors in the world, Crosman imported fine examples of German guncraft such as break barrel springers Anschütz and Diana. In the early 90`s Crosman Airguns acquired Benjamin and Sheridan Companies and take over the dominant position in the US market as manufacturer of high-end pneumatic and CO2 powered Airguns.
One of the best designs, 760 Pumpmaster rifle, have been sold since they debuted 48 years ago, in more than 17 million 760 Pumpmasters. Based on a tried and true design, Crosman released in 2011 redesigned 760 Pumpmaster in AR-mania fashion, the M4-177 rifle. The older airgun enthusiast preferring military and police style weapons certainly remember the earlier Crosman Model M-1 Carbine, a popular slide action repeater produced from 1968-1976. In any case, Crosman Corporation has recently brought out its a modern style BB and pellet gun resembling a tactical carbine, based on the AR platform. As the “M4” in the name strongly implies, this new rifle looks and some would say “feels” like a real M4 firearm.
Although the Crosman company takes pride in the fact that the majority of its guns are built in the United States, the Crosman M4-177 Pneumatic Air Rifle is made in China and some sellers give the wrong information about the country of origin of guns.
With its instantly recognizable modern military styling the M4-177 is a .177 caliber multi-stroke pneumatic air rifle capable of firing both .177 pellets and .177 BBs. Residing in the lower price point class this is not certainly a target gun, but a starter gun to practice shooting with. Weighing only 3.56 lbs with an overall length of 34 inches, this lightweight and handy equivalent of the M16 rifle is all made out of plastic except for the rifled steel barrel, even the “iron sights” are actually made of durable plastic.
However, since this air rifle shares the adaptability of the AR platform, it is highly customizable, so the shooter could add real gun accessories, all full metal made, which builds on some balanced weight which has helped make an M4-177 much more realistic and accurate.
On the other hand, the M4-177 has similar functionality to many of other Crosman multi pump pneumatics with the forearm of the gun serving as the pump for the M4-177. Using the forearm as a pumping arm for charging the multi-stroke pneumatic action you can pump up at least 3 pumps to make the gun to work properly and up to 10 pumps into the gun for maximum velocity. CAUTION- never exceed 10 pumps. The multi pump pneumatic firing mechanism allows for variable power and enables you to adjust the velocity by increasing or decreasing the number of pumps. The .177 caliber air rifle features a rifled steel barrel and shoots both pellets (up to 700fps) and BBs (up to 660fps), and the gun must be cocked and pumped before it can be fired. Since it does contain a rifled barrel, some gun writers do not recommend shooting BBs as this will wear out the rifling. Another objection concerns the rifle`s forend bottom rail which is unfortunately unusable because when you pump the gun there’s just not enough clearance. The other three rails are placed adequately so the Weaver/Picatinny rail on the flat top receiver will accept any number of accessories and also the removable rear sight as well as top rail on the front side of the gun will accommodate the front sight.
Speaking of the stock, some airgunners claim as benefit its ambidextrous, adjustable/telescoping stock (30.5″ to 33.75″), meaning that it will fit a child or small person as well as it would a large adult. However, there are many reports about butts have tendencies to break after several months of medium use. The rifle also includes the faux removable magazine serving as a storage place for the extra pellet strips and the front sight adjustment tool.
Certainly, the best M4-177 feature is the way that this weapon handles ammunition. The gun has space in the stock containing a BB reservoir that can hold up to 350 BBs and a BBs magazine that holds 18 shots loading them into the chamber by tipping the gun barrel down. As another ammo option, the gun comes equipped with a five shot pellet magazine/strip, which uses the bolt action to slide the new pellet into place – same ones used by the Crosman 760 Pumpmaster.
While the BBs will go faster and reach higher velocities, they are much less accurate and deliver less energy on target. It is recommended when you shoot steel BBs, do not shoot at hard objects or water because the BBs will ricochet! With an average BB that weighs 5.1 grains you are likely to reach a medium velocity of 630 fps, with an average muzzle energy of 4.58 foot pounds. Regarding pellets, at 10 pumps, the M4-177 launches Crosman Premier 7.9 gr pellets at about 620 fps and delivered muzzle energy of 4.93 ft/lbs.
With aforementioned muzzle energy and .177 caliber (4.5 mm) hollow point pellets Crosman is undoubtedly capable of solving rodent problems, especially through urban areas, but in my opinion, air guns of this class are only and solely intended for target shooting and plinking. As entry level gun Crosman M4-177 is ideal for kids and youngsters, although adult supervision and protective eyewear are always necessary.
As it is a new one, the M4-177 is remarkably accurate, shooting a one-inch edge to edge 5 shot group at 13 yards, but after longer usage the precision dramatically declines due to pretty miserable sights and overall production. In a nutshell, by making this gun mostly out of plastic and trying to make a less expensive gun, Crosman appears to have “missed the target” with this gun.